About your Search

20120901
20120930
STATION
CNBC 45
FBC 28
WHUT (Howard University Television) 15
CSPAN 10
CNN 8
CNNW 8
KQED (PBS) 8
KRCB (PBS) 7
WMPT (PBS) 7
CSPAN2 6
WETA 5
KQEH (PBS) 4
KNTV (NBC) 3
MSNBC 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 184
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 186 (some duplicates have been removed)
from both the government and the opposition, the united states is taking the next up in normalizing our commercial relationship. >> the national football league has reached an agreement to end a labor dispute with the referees. the nfl rushed to make the deal after a botched call by replacement officials decided the outcome of a nationally televised game monday night, prompting widespread outrage from fans, journalists, and the teams. you can go to democracynow.org to see our interview with sportswriter dave zirin. in sweden, the 2012 right livelihood awards have been announced to four recipients. turkish environmental activist hayrettin karaca "for a lifetime of tireless advocacy and support for the protection and stewardship of our natural world." afghan women's activist -- a u.s. scholar gene sharp -- and to britain's campaign against arms trade -- handed out annually, the right glove awards are widely known as the alternative nobel prize. those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we begin our show with a l
and the united states than it was 30 years ago. if you had compared 30 years ago the united states the difference between the rich and the poor here as opposed to the countries of western europe we were the most egalitarian of countries. now we are the least. we have outstripped everybody else because our capitalism has been relatively robust and when capitalism can do its thing, it polarizes and when a polarizes, it creates an awareness which is probably also occur to you. if a growing number of people are having a hard time and there are are a shrinking number of people collecting enormous wealth, it will occur to you that this is happening and it may develop a resentment against the other group. if you have a system like capitalism coexisting, not that you have to, but if you have a system of capitalism coexisting with a democratic society in which everybody has both in the following insightful occur to a lot of people. week, the majority, are really getting screwed in the economy. the way to fix it, to reverse it, to offset it is to use the political system to get that result. in the politica
the united states, i am sure libya receives money. it was even greater because the american ambassador -- i am supportive of the arab spring. the times and elsewhere, i said to myself, they are not great people. but they are people that surely will turn out nice to us. it doesn't make any sense. >> the events of the last week, the embassy attacks, it will result in a further ongoing shift of jewish americans changing -- >> i think there is a little more to follow. the shift in special elections indicated deep distrust of this administration. that was clear. what the administration said, you heard what the state said. the message was sent loud and clear. for a while, i think it was always together. we have heard the state department say that they have taken every reasonable step. we have heard the quote from the ambassador suggesting he was comfortable and these people love me. it's not true. he issued a statement saying he is very concerned about his own safety. again, we have an information gap. that is coming home to roost. this will build. >> today's new york times, the interview with th
and the united states. the united states has sard, i'm not going to let iran get the bomb. the president said, if they go assemble a nuclear weapon, that is a red line for me. president netanyahu says iran cannot have the no-how and technology. that's a red line for him. it's a difference of opinion. the prime minister is looking for the president to inch up on that line. i think the president made it clear he's not going to tolerate iran with a nuclear weapon. he dubt want to give iran wiggle room. doesn't want to show iran how far it has to go. >> you talk about setting a red line. you're talking about a potential strike or something militarily. that clearly raises a whole different set of discussions. the president also talked about the violent protests in arab countries over what he described at the crude and disgusting antimuslim video. what was the message he was trying to send to countries trying to move forward after the arab spring revolutions? >> he was trying to do a couple of things. on one hand, trying to say this violence is not the answer. clearly, the united states does not be
are reaction to a little-known amateur movie produced in the united states which ridiculed the prophet mohammed. it gained attention because an obscure florida pastor began promoting it, the same man who triggered deadly riots in afghanistan when he threatened to burn the koran. we want to go straight to cairo where we find nbc chief foreign correspondent, richard engel. richard, fill us in a little more this morning. >> reporter: good morning. a libyan source has told nbc news that the u.s. ambassador who was visiting the consulate was killed along with three others. not sure of the nationality of those three others. the u.s. state department has not confirmed this, but this has been told to us by a senior security source in libya. we've been also told that the libyan prime minister and the libyan president will both be speaking today about this subject, offering their condolences to the united states and to the family of the fallen ambassador. and this is according to the report. we were told that when gunmen and a mob stormed the consulate building, they first attacked it with rpgs, then the
that the united states government had nothing to do with this video. i believe its message must be rejected. it is an insult not only to muslims but to america as well. in 2012, at a time when anyone with a cell phone can spread offensive views are around the world with the click of a button, the notion that we can control the flow of information is obsolete. how do we respond? on this, we must agree there is no speech that justifies mindless violence. >> he also addressed ongoing tensions with iran. saying he hopes to resolve the nuclear standoff through diplomacy. >> just as it restricts the rights of its own people, the government continues to prop up a dictator in damascus and supports terrorist units abroad. it has failed to take the opportunity to demonstrate that its nuclear program is peaceful. let me be clear. america wants to resolve this issue. we believe there is still time and space to do so. >> secretary general ban ki moon opened the general assembly with an appeal to end the bloodshed in syria. he also criticized israel for ongoing expansion in the occupied territories and r
that egypt receives from the united states and i'm sure libya receives money -- i don't know how much, but i'm sure it does. and the amount was greater because the imbass door from libya had help arab spring. i've never been supportive of the arab spring. i know the columnists and the "times" and elsewhere extol it. we're friends with people who i'm sure will turn time-out be hostile to us. it doesn't make any sense. why should anybody trust us in the future? i'm not talking about mubarak how we threw him under the bus. those were the background facts that caused me to react strongly. >> congressman, you are very much the beneficiary of a shift in jewish vote in your district of queens and brooklyn. do you think the events, the attacks will result in yet a further ongoing shift of jewish americans changing -- >> i do. and i think there's a little more to follow. the shift in the special election indicated the distrust of this administration. and it was clear we heard what he said. we heard what the administration say and people didn't believe it. and the message was sent loud and clear. and
's been no confirmation from the united states. the secretary of hillary clinton issued a statement. but she added there is no justification for violence. emily buchanon has more. >> inferno overnight at the u.s. consulate in benghazi. militants stormed the compound and set fire to buildings. it's not clear yet how the ambassador died, but reports suggests his car may have come under rocket attacks as he and others were trying to escape. the anger was sparked by a provocative film made by an israeli american about the life of the prophet muhammad. >> my name is christopher stevens and i'm the new u.s. ambassador to libya. >> the american ambassador of christopher stevens had a lifelong interest in the middle east. he had been in libya for less than four months after taking up his post in may. the killings was strongly condemned by libya's general national congress. it's not clear who is responsible. some suggest hard line groups. but the country's deputy interior minister accused realm thans for testing about the treatment of gaddafi. >> let's go live to libya. our correspondence --
, president of the united states of america. >> mr. president, mr. secretary general, fellow delegates, ladies and gentleman, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town called grass valley, california, the son of a lawyer and a musician. as a young man, chris joined the peace corps, and taught english in morocco. and he came to love and respect the people of north africa and the middle east. he would carry that commitment throughout his life. as a diplomat, he worked from egypt to syria, from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked -- tasting the local food, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, arriving on a cargo ship. as america's representative, he helped the libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for the future in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. and after the revolution, he supported the birt
are furious with the united states -- if you talk to the pakistanis, we want the opportunity, and we want that kind of social link. it would help to build ties with the united states, and put a lot more of our concentration into society where the face of society is the face of your neighbor, the engineer who works in a ditch, the face of a student, the face of your child who has come to america, etc.. our focus on what pakistan is. i am not sure that is going to be possible in the next two years, and this is my second point. i will get back to the international element in a minute. i think that it is right for us to make sure that we focus on the issue of the counterinsurgency issues that we have. we have to deal with that correctly. we have to deal with al qaeda. we have to do with international terrorism. until 2014, it is unlikely in my mind that we can have a major change. that does not mean we cannot do our hallmark. it does not mean we cannot get, for example, the dynamic, philanthropic sector of pakistan to work with the thorough -- very dynamic philanthropic sector in the states,
, in a sense, talking about, like, the 99%. think of, you know, some of the demonstrators m united states or in europe who have also said that the system is rigged against them. there might be some resonance. >> the american delegation, they walk out. clearly, that was not unexpected, but you did have some real power players who are sitting there. he does have a world audience, a wobbled stage. you've got russia wra. you have iran. china. the u.k. many of these other very powerful players here. how do they respond to them him? >> you know, if you look at russia and china, they believe that each country should be loued to do what it wants, and if they want to talk, let them talk. although russia does support the let's say movement to try to limit iran's ability to develop a nuclear bomb, and that would put them on the side of the united states. when it comes to kind of let them talk, they would sit there and listen to it. the united states decided not to even walk out. they didn't even walk in. they issued a statement. maybe we can read that statement if we have it. yes. coming from the sp
to where they were, we were in belt largest expansion in the history of the united states. fix medicare. allow negotiations for prescription drugs. that will save $240 billion over 10 years, and finally, takeaway subsidies from the big oil companies. they are very profitable, but they do not need our help. what you end up with then is not a $1 trillion problem. you end up with a problem in the $200 billion range. raising the ceiling, a default for the nation. he spoke out against the fairfax chamber and other chambers, and now he is saying, "wait a minute. we cannot make cuts." when he is running as the guy who wants to make cuts. he has more sides then a rubik cube. >> what your so-called plan would do to jobs. i think you should be taking into account what the impact is on jobs, and our economy, which is a major, major concern. you talked about bob mcdonnell and eric cantor. what they did was pass a measure that would avert these devastating cuts to our national defense and jobs in virginia. what has this than that done? absolutely nothing. they have not passed a budget in 3.5 years.
of countries is holding the iranian government accountable. the united states will do what we must to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. >> the president's speeches at the u.n. and the clinton global initiative put him on the stage. jessica, there was tough talk on iran. the president seemed to counter some of the remarks made by president ahmadinejad, who, for all intents and purposes, could be the last time he's in the united states as a member of the general alembssembassembly. what was the line the president took on iran? >> he took a tough line. this is an existential fight on israel. he said time is not unlimited for the world to stop iran from pursuing nuclear ambitions. weapons ambitions. he said that the u.s. will do what it must to stop it. another way of saying, indirectly, that all options are on the table. he's effectively taking the sam stance he gave earlier this year. but, he didn't go -- didn't go further and draw any red lines or new lines which is what the romney campaign was calling on him to do. it would be astonishing if he would do that at this stage, only fo
drones. it is coming from two respected universities in the united states. i think if this message is coming from independent academics and the united states, maybe it will be listened to. the report conclude the strikes are damaging and counterproductive. they estimate the overall number of top leaders killed among the drone victims is perhaps only 2%. they say while they are not killing the top tier or not be enough of the commanders, they are terrorizing an entire community. that is the word that they use, stressing that the drones hovering overhead night and day. they say communities are paralyzed by fear and many people are too frightened to go to import and gatherings. parent are keeping their children out of schools or the children themselves are too traumatized to go. the level of fear has been compared to the level of fear in the u.s. after 9/11. >> the report also says the vast majority of those victims are combatants or low-level combatants. americas argument is if it did not use drones, it would have to use much more interest of tactics to go after these combatants. >>
right here in the united states. she joins us live tonight from bahrain. melissa, great to see you, safe and sound. you spent the night on the uss enterprise, the crown jewel of the navy's fifth fleet. stationed in bahrain where the iran threatened to shut down. this is a vessel with tremendous amount of history. tell us about it. >> oh, absolutely. it has been on the water for 51 years. it was parked off cuba during the cuban missile crisis. right now it is patrolling the arabian sea as you said, keeping the strait of hormuz open. rear admiral walter carter talked to us exclusive and we asked him how leaders in the area feel about iran's threat to shut down the strait of hormuz and here's what he had to say. >> like the entire global economy. they're very concerned about that and our job here is to make sure that freedom of navigation occurs through that very critical strait. it is well-known the amount of trade and commerce that goes through there. so just take a look what goes through there. liquified natural gas, huge product that comes out of the country of qatar. oil products impor
the president strongly defend one of the united states' deadliest and most effective weapons against would-be terrorists. and in a cnn exclusive, the brother of al qaeda's top leader now says there is a way to reconciliation and peace. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room"." >>> all that coming up. we begin with a very public and new escalation of some tension between president obama and prime minister benjamin netanyahu. israeli sources tell me the white house at least for now has rejected prime minister netanyahu's request to meet with him later this month to discuss iran's nuclear program. the israelis were told a meeting isn't possible because of the president's schedule, schedule won't permit it even when they offer to have the prime minister come to washington from new york where he'll be addressing the united nations. the white house is pushing back saying the president and prime minister simply won't be in new york at the same time this month to address the u.n. but this is just the tip of the icebe iceberg. in a much bigger disagreement right now over iran's suspected q
is enshrined in our laws . our constitution protects the right to free speech. here in the united states, countless publicications provoke offense. like me, the majorit of the merrence are christian and yet we don't ban blasphemy on our sacred beliefs. as president of our country and commander of chief of our military i accept people call me awful things every day. and i will always defend their right to do so. >> steve: if the president continues to talk about freedom of speech we have in this country, that's true. but why the dumb movie? he kept referring to the movie as the cause of the movie. the administration said it is nootnot true. >> gretchen: i can think of countless other examples of freedom of speech . maybe he shouldn't have chosen himself of people speaking poorly approximate him. is that a plan because of the election? some people say yes including newt gingrich. >> hillary clinton is a serious problem. and barack obama is ambitious person. they are different. hillary clinton gets up every day thinking of public policy. barack obama gets up every day thinking about bark ob
economy. that is why he united states will do what we must to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. >> woodruff: but iran's president, mahmoud ahmadinejad, has long insisted that the country's nuclear program is only for peaceful purposes. and during his own speech yesterday, he denounced potential military action by israel. >> testing new generations of ultra-modern weaponry and the pledge to disclose these armaments in due time is now being used as a new language of threat against nations to coerce them into accepting a new era of hegemony. continued threats by the uncivilized zionists to resort to military action against our great nation is a clear example of this bitter reality. >> woodruff: earlier this week, iran unveiled a new long-range reconnaissance drone and the country's revolutionary guard said it tested new missiles as well. prime minister netanyahu noted that while international sanctions by the u.s. and other countries have hurt the iranian economy, they did not stop its nuclear program. >> there's only one way to peacefully prevent iran from getting atomic bombs. a
's accomplished. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! trade tensions between the united states and china are heating up again. this morning, the two countries challenged each other in the world trade organization. the u.s. is accusing china of illegally subsidizing auto and auto parts exports, and hurting u.s. made goods. and china claims trade laws here, open the door for illegal tariffs on a wide range of chinese products. sylvia hall breaks down what's behind the latest flareup. >> reporter: here in the u.s., the auto and auto parts industries employ about 800,000 american workers. the government says those workers are hurt by the money china gives to subsidize its own auto industry. and in ohio, a key swing state fueled by cars, president obama promised a crack down: >> these are subsidies tt directly harm working men and women on the assembly lines in ohio and michigan and across the midwest. it is not right, it is against the rules, and we will not let it stand. >> reporter: the administration said that between 2009 and 2011, the chinese government offered up at least $1 billion in subsidies t
the united nations. the speech comes as the united states announced it is lifting the ban on the import of goods from burma. the opposition party led by aung san suu kyi has welcomed the lifting of the ban. the united states relaxed its financial restrictions after the country held elections earlier this year. here is out the u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton justified the move. >> the united states is taking the next step in normalizing our commercial will relationship. we hope this will provide more opportunities for your people to sell their goods into our markets. >> our correspondent jonathan hefad has been talking to the speaker of the burmese parliament, one of the top generals and the old regime. she gets -- began by asking about the state of relations between the government and opposition parties. >> i have a good relationship with aung san suu kyi. what happened in the past is over. it is finished. i don't see any point in dwelling on it. because she also loves the country, for people, we have the same intentions. she was locked up for many, many years. the >> she was lo
. that is protected in the united states by the first amendment. they just do not have the power to change any of that. the fact that, you know, the secretary of state in the united states saying this film is bad and reprehensible and disgusting -- that is an expression of her opinion. it is not a promise to introduce legislation to curb that. they should listen to the prime minister of turkey, the president of egypt, you know, the pakastani is. all these muslim countries. what they are really seeking is an amendment of the first amendment, and that just is not going to happen. >> should there not the laws against inciting, as it were, religious hatred? there are such laws in some countries -- the united kingdom. presumably those are lots you think should exist, no? >> i do not think that such laws should exist. if you look at the history of the freedom of speech, the freedom of conscience, the freedom of expression in europe and america, this is the culmination of the victory of the individual. it has become one of the most basic human rights. this was not achieved overnight. hundreds of years went b
as proactive as it has been because there as been paralysis on the fiscal side in the united states. there really has not been any effort on the republican -- on the political side to do much about the job situation. the burden has fallen disproportionately on the central bank. with the too much government is the problem, that is a discussion we have been having since the beginning of time. host: unemployment by education level, 12% with those with high school education, with college, 6.6%. guest: people like to talk about the more education you have the less unemployment you have. unemployment has gone up for all of the groups. college graduates or not, people are struggling. you could have a large student loan and not find a job. host: we have a caller. go ahead. caller: how many of the jobs are jobs with which people can support themselves or their families? guest: you make a fair point. the unemployment rate is one measure of unemployment. there is also a measure that tries to take into account people who are working part time, but would rather be working full time. if you inclu
the temperature cool. nay are actively working behind the scenes. >> i know the government of the united states is quietly talking japan and china. we have failed our growing relationship with china. >> amitage view reflects growing concern among american officials. the u.s. government remain a neutral stance. because japan controls the territory japan u.s. security treaty extends to the islands. chinese vessels have been navigating the waters around the island. japan coast guard crews have been keeping an eye on them. obviousers fear an absence of dialogue and the crisis mechanism could lead to unintended consequences which could mean the united states would not be able to stay neutral. >> japan and china are said to mark 40 years. organizers have cancelled a number of events. government officials celebrated the friendship year for japan china people to people exchanges. as of thursday 29 events in both countries have been cancelled or postponed. japan airlines reports that about 12,000 seats for its group tour bookings have been cancelled. some car dealerships in china have scrapped their pla
things that is not a premarket industry in the united states because regardless of whether we have the information as to the optimus and effectiveness of a hospital or a physician problem -- or a physician, our health care provider networks that we are allowed to use are dictated by the insurance companies. a lot of the discussion about health care in the united states, people fail to discuss the role of the insurance companies and in network and out of network providers. i would like for you to comment on a world of our employers and large insurance companies play in directing where we get care. oftentimes, we are not allowed to get hair -- get care at, say, a university hospital or a teaching hospital regardless of our condition since solely because the out of pocket expenses will be way too high for a person to report getting the best care, even though it exists. guest: in my book and "and accountable," i share the reasons why it patient often decides to come to, particular hospital. their mother was treated there, the party was easy. if people are choosing a hospital based on t
a violent protests. an agreement was reached with lonmin earlier this week. the united states says that china has apologized for allowing a group of protesters to vandalize the u.s. ambassador's car. it was pelted with objects and flag was damaged. beijing says it is investigating the incident. while a video continues to fuel protest, one of the actors it is filminsuing the film maker for . she says she was told she was appearing in and adventure film based in egypt. to what is believed to be the case of a u.k. soldier giving birth to a baby on the frontline. she gave birth just days after the area came under attack from the taliban. it was a bit of a surprise because she did not know she was pregnant. >> the soldier from the royal artillery has been serving in afghanistan since march. two days ago, she complained of severe stomach pains. her son was delivered safely at the field hospital. he was born prematurely during the 34th week of her pregnancy. the specialist pediatric team from the hospital will now travel to camp to help provide care to the soldier and her baby on their fl
for this is the books are conceived as a history of the united states sort of as told through biographies and i was looking for a woman subject for one of these and in fact i found one but my publisher wouldn't let me do it. can you guess what woman i was looking for and found? eleanor roosevelt. i mean, just the fact that it's a very short list of women who played a large role in american public life on whom i can hang a tale of four or five decades of american history. women have had of course their roles in private life but it is in the nature of private life it usually doesn't survive in the historical record. why did people start saving the letters of eleanor roosevelt? because she was important. do your correspondence save your letters that you write to them and then do they deposit them in the local historical society? well, maybe, and if they do you will become, can i use my words adviseably, here, you will become literally immortal. you will become immortal in letters because future historians will find those letters. they will say ah, that is what life was like at the beginning of the
in vermont. of course, the company's first set up. and we still make 70% of our products in the united states. cheryl: and you've been there for 25 years, we should mention to our viewers, you yourself have been with this company for 25 years. one of the most impressive things, i think s you've been able to keep 70% of your manufacturing in the united states at plants in the united states. what's the secret? >> well, the secret is what you have also indicated is the fact of being around for a long time and also thinking long term, making investments. you know, manufacturing in the united states is not easy, and if you're not thinking long term, if you're not continuously investing, it's not possible. because, you know, we have great people, we've got great history. we, in fact, have 73 locations in china and 60% of the product we're shipping from the united states to china. in furniture which is, you know, not made by robots. we still have a lot of labor even though we have a lot of, lot of technology that we've introduced. so i think it's a question of quality, it's a question of craftmanshi
in our laws. our constitution protects the right to practice free speech. here in the united states, countless publications provoke offense. like me, the majority of americans are christian and yet we do not plan blasphemy against our most sacred beliefs. >> watched that and was ripping my hair out. do we really think that was about the movie. here he is legitimatizing that point of view saying all this had to do with the movie. first of all do you believe that the attacks on the ambassador were -- >> president obama were a law professor he would describe that as a red herring that is totally irrelevant concern that takes the obama administration kind of off the hook for how they missed the ba on this. this was a planned attack. melissa: right. >> he had u.n. ambassador on a week and a half ago saying this was spontaneous attack that is ridiculous statement. these were grenades that were propelled in a massive way. these were massive arms. people don't bring these things to, to spontaneous demonstrations. now all this evidence is coming out that the ambassador himself had, had a dia
that israel is in a position whereby no red line by the international community, by the united states, israel may have to do what it has to do and then make the phone calls. melissa: yeah. we were all sort of stunned in the newsroom and stood up and looked at this because he is holding up this giant whiteboard to make his point. what do you think the reaction will be now? >> well the reaction of course on behalf of the iranian regime and their allies, that would be the syrian regime, hezbollah in lebanon, some politicians in iraq, hamas maybe, they could attack the prime minister of israel and accuse him of escalation. reality others in the region, such as saudies, kuwaities, threatened by the iranians have someone speaking on their behalf but not a arab leader, the leader of israel. melissa: i was in the middle east recently and leaders are definitely nervous. they see this as almost an inevitable conclusion at this point. do you think 70% to a bomb is about where they are? do you think it is even further than that? >> i think iranians are working on two tracks. one is slowly gradually to ge
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 186 (some duplicates have been removed)